1. Hubble captured a supernova at three different ages in one image  Syfy
  2. Astronomers Captured The Incredibly Rare Sight of a Star Mere Hours After It Exploded  ScienceAlert
  3. WOW! NASA Hubble Space Telescope captures 11-bn-year old supernova explosion  HT Tech
  4. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope watched a distant star die, explode, and fade away in rare, colorful detail  Yahoo! Voices
  5. Time-lapse view of ancient supernova was hiding in old Hubble data  Inverse
  6. View Full coverage on Google News
Using Hubble data, astronomers showed an 11-billion-year-old supernova in the process of exploding, in three different images.The universe is big, it’s old, and there’s a lot of weird stuff out there. Including the Muppets. In Muppets from Space (now streaming on Peacock!), the 1999 comedy featuring our favorite felt-covered friends, Gonzo is experiencing something of an identity crisis.

Hubble shot a supernova at three different ages in one image | SYFY WIRE

The core-collapse supernova of a massive star rapidly brightens when a shock, produced following the collapse of its core, reaches the stellar surface. As the shock-heated star subsequently expands and cools, its early-time light curve should have a simple dependence on the size of the progenitor1 and therefore final evolutionary state. Measurements of the radius of the progenitor from early light curves exist for only a small sample of nearby supernovae2–14, and almost all lack constraining ultraviolet observations within a day of explosion. The several-day time delays and magnifying ability of galaxy-scale gravitational lenses, however, should provide a powerful tool for measuring the early light curves of distant supernovae, and thereby studying massive stellar populations at high redshift. Here we analyse individual rest-frame exposures in the ultraviolet to the optical taken with the Hubble Space Telescope, which simultaneously capture, in three separate gravitationally lensed images, the early phases of a supernova at redshift z ≈ 3 beginning within 5.8 ± 3.1 hours of explosion. The supernova, seen at a lookback time of approximately 11.5 billion years, is strongly lensed by an early-type galaxy in the Abell 370 cluster. We constrain the pre-explosion radius to be $$53{3}_{-119}^{+154}$$  solar radii, consistent with a red supergiant. Highly confined and massive circumstellar material at the same radius can also reproduce the light curve, but because no similar low-redshift examples are known, this is unlikely. The early stages of a lensed supernova at redshift 3 are found in images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, with observations beginning from around 5.8 hours after the explosion.Nature - The early stages of a lensed supernova at redshift 3 are found in images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, with observations beginning from around 5.8 hours after the explosion.

Shock cooling of a red-supergiant supernova at redshift 3 in lensed images | Nature

It's an inconvenient truth of astronomy that nobody gets a personal invitation to witness a star's dying breaths.It was a big one too.

Astronomers Captured The Incredibly Rare Sight of a Star Mere Hours After It Exploded : ScienceAlert

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A star 500 times larger than the sun collapsed, exploded, and died in a supernova 11 billion years ago. Hubble captured the whole colorful process.A star 500 times larger than the sun collapsed, exploded, and died in a supernova 11 billion years ago. Hubble captured the whole colorful process.

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope watched a distant star die, explode, and fade away in rare, colorful detail

A supernova is a stellar explosion, which occurs when the lives of some really massive stars come to an end. A supernova is a stellar explosion, which occurs when the lives of some really massive stars come to an end.

Supernova allows us to understand the origin of elements in the universe: Research | Tech News

An image taken in 2010 captured the lensed supernova, but nobody noticed.An image taken in 2010 captured the lensed supernova, but nobody noticed.

Single Hubble image captured supernova at three different times | Ars Technica

Single Hubble image captured supernova at three different times – Ars Technica

The observations include the first few hours of the supernova explosion.The observations include the first few hours of the supernova explosion.

Timeline Of A Star Going Supernova Captured In Incredible Single Image | IFLScience

An international research team led by the University of Minnesota Twin Cities has measured the size of a star dating back 2 billion years after the Big Bang, or more than 11 billion years ago. Detailed ...

Red-supergiant supernova images reveal secrets of an earlier universe

EarthSky | One supernova at 3 different times in cosmic history

The Hubble Space Telescope captured three magnificent stages of a star right as it exploded — but it's gone unnoticed until now.The Hubble Space Telescope captured three magnificent stages of a star right as it exploded — but it's gone unnoticed until now.

NASA Releases Hubble Images of Star Right as It Explodes

A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away…A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away…

NASA’s Hubble telescope captures image of supernova from over 11 billion years ago | Evening Standard

The Hubble Space Telescope has captured a distant star exploding earlier than ever before, allowing astronomers to watch the first eight days of a star’s violent deathThe Hubble Space Telescope has captured a distant star exploding earlier than ever before, allowing astronomers to watch the first eight days of a star’s violent death

Astronomers saw a distant supernova less than 6 hours after it blew up | New Scientist

Blast from the Past Caught in Episodes Due to Gravitational Lensing Light from a star that exploded over 11 billion years ago was captured by the Hubble Space Telescope. It was not just one postcard from the remote past but three messages that chronicle the fading fireball over a period of one week

Secrets of an Earlier Universe: Hubble Captures Red Supergiant Supernova From 11 Billion Years Ago

Secrets of an Earlier Universe: Hubble Captures Red Supergiant Supernova From 11 Billion Years Ago

The supernova, about 500 times larger than the sun, is the first detailed look of its kind so early into the history of the universe.The supernova, about 500 times larger than the sun, is the first detailed look of its kind so early into the history of the universe.

Hubble Telescope captures explosion of star over 11 billion years ago

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Three different moments in a far-off supernova explosion were captured in a single snapshot by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. The star exploded more than 11 billion years ago, when the universe was less than a fifth of its current age of 13.8 billion years.Three different moments in a far-off supernova explosion were captured in a single snapshot by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. The star exploded more than 11 billion years ago, when the universe was less than a fifth of its current age of 13.8 billion years.

Hubble Captures 3 Faces of Evolving Supernova in Early Universe | NASA

Archival images from the Hubble Space Telescope have revealed an infant supernova photographed just hours after the star's explosion 11.5 billion years ago.Three images captured the progression of the supernova just hours after the initial explosion.

Hubble Space Telescope captures a supernova as it explodes | Space