1. A Bizarre Jellyfish Species Can Sting You Without Touch by Hurling 'Mucus Grenades'  ScienceAlert
  2. Upside-down jellyfish release venom-filled 'bombs' in their snot  Livescience.com
  3. Upside-Down Jellyfish Release Weaponized Goo Packed With Toxic ‘Grenades’  Gizmodo
  4. Stinging Water Mystery Solved – “Mucus Grenades”  SciTechDaily
  5. Stinging water mystery solved: Jellyfish can sting swimmers, prey with 'mucus grenades'  EurekAlert
  6. View Full coverage on Google News
A species of jellyfish hunts its prey by hurling venom grenades to create "stinging water", researchers said Thursday, solving a long-standing mystery as to how they gather food without tentacles.A species of jellyfish hunts its prey by hurling venom grenades to create "stinging water", researchers said Thursday, solving a long-standing mystery as to how they gather food without tentacles.

A Bizarre Jellyfish Species Can Sting You Without Touch by Hurling 'Mucus Grenades'

The water surrounding upside-down jellyfish often stings to the touch, and now scientists know why.The water surrounding upside-down jellyfish often stings to the touch, and now scientists know why.

Upside-down jellyfish release venom-filled 'bombs' in their snot | Live Science

Swimmers in warm coastal regions often exhibit sting-like symptoms despite not coming into direct contact with venomous animals such as jellyfish. Scientists have now pinpointed the cause of these “stinging waters” to a particular jellyfish equipped with its own weaponized mucus. Swimmers in warm coastal regions often exhibit sting-like symptoms despite not coming into direct contact with venomous animals such as jellyfish. Scientists have now pinpointed the cause of these “stinging waters” to a particular jellyfish equipped with its own weaponized mucus.

Upside-Down Jellyfish Release Weaponized Goo Packed With Toxic ‘Grenades’

Jellyfish Can Sting Swimmers, Prey With “Mucus Grenades” Interdisciplinary research team discovers, describes new free-floating jellyfish stinging structures. In warm coastal waters around the world, swimmers can often spot large groups of jellyfish pulsing rhythmically on the seafloor. Unless p

Stinging Water Mystery Solved – “Mucus Grenades”

Stinging Water Mystery Solved – “Mucus Grenades”

In warm coastal waters around the world, swimmers can often spot large groups of jellyfish pulsing on the seafloor. It is best to avoid areas that upside-down jellyfish inhabit: getting close can lead to irritating stings, even without contact. Researchers have taken a close look at the cause of this mysterious 'stinging water.' Now, a team of scientists reports in Communications Biology, a journal from Nature Research, on the culprit -- a toxin-filled mucus the jellyfish release into the water.In warm coastal waters around the world, swimmers can often spot large groups of jellyfish pulsing on the seafloor. It is best to avoid areas that upside-down jellyfish inhabit: getting close can lead to irritating stings, even without contact. Researchers have taken a close look at the cause of this mysterious 'stinging water.' Now, a team of scientists reports in Communications Biology, a journal from Nature Research, on the culprit -- a toxin-filled mucus the jellyfish release into the water.

Stinging water mystery solved: Jellyfish can sting swimmers, prey with 'mucus grenades' | EurekAlert! Science News

Cassiopea jellyfish make up for their lack of tentacles by releasing gooey clouds full of autopiloted stingers.Cassiopea jellyfish make up for their lack of tentacles by releasing gooey clouds full of autopiloted stingers.

These jellyfish can sting without touching you, thanks to 'mucus grenades'

Cassiopea xamachana jellyfish sit on the floor of a body of water appearing like a fabulous bit of plant life from another world. Their appendages range fromCassiopea xamachana jellyfish sit on the floor of a body of water appearing like a fabulous bit of plant life from another world. Their appendages range from light white to dark hues of blue &#8211…

Upside-down jellyfish-deployed venom bombs remind us nature is lit - SlashGear

Smithsonian scientists discovered that tiny 'mucus grenades' are responsible for a mysterious phenomenon known as 'stinging water'Smithsonian scientists discovered that tiny 'mucus grenades' are responsible for a mysterious phenomenon known as 'stinging water'

These Jellyfish Don't Need Tentacles to Deliver a Toxic Sting | Science | Smithsonian Magazine

It’s the mucus of upside-down jellyfish.It’s the mucus of upside-down jellyfish.

Revealed: the mystery of stinging water | Cosmos

Upside-down jellyfish release tiny balls of stinging cells that can move through water on their own and survive for days – leaving a network of mucus that can sting youUpside-down jellyfish release tiny balls of stinging cells that can move through water on their own and survive for days – leaving a network of mucus that can sting you

This is how jellyfish can sting you without even touching you | New Scientist

The upside-down jellyfish is mostly stationary, so it evolved self-propelling cells that can swim over and sting you on its behalf.The upside-down jellyfish is mostly stationary, so it evolved self-propelling cells that can swim over and sting you on its behalf.

Like the world isn’t a scary enough place these days as is, now we have to contend with jellyfish hurling “mucus grenades.”Like the world isn’t a scary enough place these days as is, now we have to contend with jellyfish hurling venomous mucus “grenades.” As much as we’d love to take credit for that description, we can

Upside-down jellyfish unleash venomous mucus grenades

Beware the 'mucus grenades'Beware the 'mucus grenades'

Jellyfish-studying scientists may have solved 'stinging water' mystery | Metro News

A team of researchers from the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History discovered the microscopic stinging structures in the mucus left by upside-down jellyfish.A team of researchers from the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History discovered the microscopic stinging structures in the mucus left by upside-down jellyfish.

Jellyfish create 'slime grenades' in water that irritate your skin even if you haven't touched them  | Daily Mail Online

Researchers have found mobile cellular blobs coated with stinging cells in mucus from a jellyfish that sits upside-down on the seafloor.

Jellyfish snot can sting swimmers who never touch the animal | Science News

A species of jellyfish hunts its prey by hurling venom grenades to create 'stinging water,' researchers said Thursday, solving a long-standing mystery as to how they gather food without tentacles.A species of jellyfish hunts its prey by hurling venom grenades to create 'stinging water,' researchers said Thursday, solving a long-standing mystery as to how they gather food without tentacles.

Jellyfish hurl venom 'grenades' to snare prey | CTV News

Upside-down jellyfish on the ocean floor release venom-filled blobs of mucus, which can sting nearby swimmers, new research reveals.Upside-down jellyfish on the ocean floor release venom-filled blobs of mucus, which can sting nearby swimmers, new research reveals.

It was thought that the stings came from detached tentacles or younger specimens.It was thought that the stings came from detached tentacles or younger specimens.

Here's how a jellyfish can sting you without even a single touch | Amazing - Geo.tv

In warm coastal waters around the world, swimmers can often spot large groups of jellyfish pulsing rhythmically on the seafloor. Unless properly prepared with protective clothing, it is best to steer ...

Stinging water mystery solved: Jellyfish can sting swimmers, prey with 'mucus grenades'